Top 10 Best keyboard apps for Android 2022

Finding the best Android keyboard apps is one of the most important choices you make on your phone. They will shape the speed and accuracy with which you use your phone to communicate, and because keyboards can see everything you type from passwords to social security numbers, it’s important to have a keyboard you trust and like. To that end, here now are the keyboards we trust and like the most to help us tweet, text, and type up our articles in a crowded bar.

These are our picks for the best Android keyboard apps

Many of us stick to the keyboard that comes pre-installed, which is likely Gboard or Samsung’s keyboard. There’s a reason why Gboard is king on Android and that’s thanks to its versatility and ability to recognize what you’re trying to type while you’re typing it. Google has also included a slew of features to help you customize and tweak the keyboard to your liking.

For years, SwiftKey’s biggest complaint was that you had to pay for it. Now that the paywall has been removed thanks to Microsoft, it’s a fantastic and completely free alternative to Gboard. And while the app has all the features you could want and more, there’s also a beta program(opens in new tab) that you can join to get all of the new features that are coming down the pipeline.

Chrooma is one of those keyboard apps for those who love customizing every aspect of their device. From pre-installed themes to creating something completely unique, there’s something here for everyone. What’s nifty about Chrooma is that it will automatically adapt to whatever app you are using, changing the color theme in the process.

1. Gboard

Gboard used to be a pretty vanilla keyboard, but steady feature additions and improvements over the past couple of years have made it one of the best in the business. Accurate word predictions, smooth glide typing, nifty gesture controls for cursor and deletion, Google Assistant and Google Translate integration, and multilingual typing are some of the main reasons why Gboard should be your default keyboard. Since it’s a Google app, it’s always getting better.

Gboard
Gboard

For example, Google is testing a new feature in the app that will make it even more convenient to quickly access clipboard content, while in Android 12, the keyboard will sync its theme with your wallpaper. The sluggishness and laggy experience that many users had complained about are gone too. It’s now as fast and smooth as it can get.

2. Swiftkey

Swiftkey has been around since the old days of Android and remains the most versatile and feature-packed keyboard you can get on the Google Play Store. Customization is the name of the game with Swiftkey, and there are tons of options and controls to really make your keyboard your very own.

Swiftkey
Swiftkey

The thing I like the most about Swiftkey is that all essentials are accessible right from the keyboard. Like Gboard, it also has a quick access bar at the top with shortcuts for GIFs, stickers, clipboard, and translator. The word predictions and auto-correct have gone a bit off lately, but hopefully, this will be fixed with updates.

3. Chrooma Keyboard

Chrooma Keyboard had some ups and downs, but it seems to have calmed down a bit. It was once one of the most popular Android keyboards but fell out of favor when it got new owners. In the last couple of years, the app has improved its responsiveness (at least on our tester phones) and it still has the Material You-style theming where it changes color based on the app you’re using.

Chrooma Keyboard
Chrooma Keyboard

There is also a GIF search, emoji support, and gesture typing. There are some issues with text correction and gesture typing and the themes can get expensive. It’s definitely the tenth out of ten on this list, but it’s still good enough to use.

4. Fleksy Keyboard

Fleksy has everything and the kitchen sink. Its autocorrect game is solid, and the clean design will make you feel right at home if you’re coming from Gboard. Apart from offering all keyboard essentials, Fleksy has some unique add-on features, called Extensions, that you’ll not find in other keyboard apps. You can add a row of the most frequently used emoji, symbols, URLs, etc.; make the keyboard completely invisible; add cool typing effects; create shortcuts for words and phrases, and so on.

Fleksy Keyboard
Fleksy Keyboard

Fleksy also offers what it refers to it as mini-apps, which lets you browse and share GIFs, memes, stickers, YouTube videos, etc., right from the keyboard. Fleksy has over 100+ themes designed by popular artists, and you can also create your own using a photo from your gallery or Unsplash library.

5. Grammarly Keyboard

Grammarly is one of the newer Android keyboards. It started life as a Chrome extension and it corrected your grammar as you typed. The Android keyboard version aims to do the same thing. It checks your grammar and spelling as well as punctuation. It’s newer, so it’s very much still in development. We expect more features to come with future updates.

Grammarly Keyboard
Grammarly Keyboard

You still get a very clean-looking keyboard that helps correct grammar mistakes in the meantime. We also like how it explains your corrections if you want it to so that you learn from them as well. The only downside is that the app has some typing bugs that we wish the developers would fix since some of them have been around for a while. Otherwise, the app is free and it does help when it works right.

6. Minuum Keyboard

There are few keyboards that look anything like Minuum, and using this keyboard is certainly an acquired taste. The name is a play on the word “minimum,” because it packs a standard QWERTY keyboard down to mostly a single row of letters, laid out in a jangly, uneven way. To use the keyboard, you’ll do a lot of gestures to magnify the part of the keyboard you’re in so you can make a selection.

 Minuum Keyboard
Minuum Keyboard

The upside is that you get a lot of real estate back for your screen to display the document that’s traditionally covered by the keyboard. The good news is that a two-finger tap instantly transforms the keyboard into a full-size QWERTY keyboard, and another tap shrinks it down again. The bad news is that the learning curve is steep, and it’s particularly clumsy until you get the hang of it. After the 30-day trial, Minuum is $3.99 to purchase.

7. Typewise Keyboard

Typewise eschews traditional square keys for hexagons. The larger targets, Typewise claims, are easier to hit and increase your accuracy. The honeycomb look of the keyboard isn’t the only novel feature here; Typewise also relies on a handful of gestures to amp up your typing speed. Swipe up to capitalize a letter, tap and hold to trigger a special character, and swipe left to delete.

Typewise Keyboard
Typewise Keyboard

There’s no glide typing here that wouldn’t work well with the keyboard’s gestures but once you get used to the input methods, Typewise is pretty fast in its own way. You can try this keyboard for free, but after that it’s $1.99 per month or a one-time lifetime fee of $24.99.

8. Slash Keyboard

Another keyboard based on extensions, or slashes, is Slash Keyboard. It has built-in search for Google, Giphy, emoji, Google Maps, YouTube, Amazon, Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, SoundCloud and many more services.

Slash Keyboard
Slash Keyboard

Hit the Slash button to the left of the space bar to immediately begin searching for something like Product Hunt. Tapping on one of the search results will automatically paste it in the text field you’re typing in.

Slash Keyboard is entirely free, and it’s very unique. I’ve always called it the Swiss Army Knife of software keyboards. However, it lacks the strong autocorrect of other keyboards, as well as gesture typing, which can make it a pain to use at times.

9. Ginger Keyboard

Ginger Keyboard has it all — themes, emoji, gesture typing, solid autocorrect, shortcuts to helpful apps (like creating a new note or task in your preferred app) and even search.

Ginger Keyboard
Ginger Keyboard

Something else that Ginger Keyboard has that you won’t find in many other keyboards is games. You can play classics like Snake or something a little newer, like 2048, without ever leaving the app you’re in. It seems odd, sure. But why not?

Ginger Keyboard also has a spell checker, which is a little different than autocorrect. However, while Ginger Keyboard is free, it limits the corrections it makes to just eight. After that, you will need to purchase a monthly subscription for $0.99 (£0.75 or AU$1.31) or annually for $8.99 (£6.82 or AU$11.90).

10. TouchPal Keyboard

TouchPal is another keyboard which seemingly has it all. It has built-in GIF support, emoticons and emoji, emoji art, a host of free and premium themes, customizable fonts, dialect dictionaries and even news headlines built into the app. You can gesture type, resize the keyboard or switch to a split keyboard, access your clipboard history and play games.

TouchPal Keyboard
TouchPal Keyboard

This keyboard is chock full of features, including an app locker to password protect certain apps.

It’s also free to download with a $4.99 per year subscription, which unlocks all the premium content.

Leave a Comment